Not sure you can allow your loved one to go into a hospital or long term care facility? (Part 1)

Not sure you can allow your loved one to go into a hospital or long term care facility? (Part 1)

by Ron King, D.Min., LMFT

Placing a loved one outside his or her own home or your own can be a difficult decision.  At times it may feel like a betrayal or failure in caregiving.  Perhaps you’ve made a promise to a dying patient (or to yourself) about providing in home care to the very end no matter what.

There are few absolutes at the end of life; we learn to face each challenge one day at a time with the realization that there are often no ideal solutions to unexpected conditions that may arise.

In some situations, however, it may wise to rethink commitments made at a certain point in the caregiving experience.  A prior decision and best intentions may no longer be the best choice to provide the most compassionate and best medical care.  There are few absolutes at the end of life; we learn to face each challenge one day at a time with the realization that there are often no ideal solutions to unexpected conditions that may arise.

Your determination to provide in home personal care to the end is noble and should be respected.  Especially if this is the wish of your loved one and you are able to carry the responsibility both emotionally and physically.  Remember, however, that both the wishes of a hospice patient and the ability of a caregiver to provide quality care may change daily.  There is no morally correct way to provide for the unique daily needs of each patient during each phase of decline at the end of life.

By now you know that hospice care can take place at home, but it can also take place in a skilled nursing facility or inpatient hospice program. Rest assured that even in a different venue, your loved one (and you) will still be able to count on the hospice team—nurses, physical and occupational therapists, aides, chaplain, social worker and volunteers—to maintain quality of life, peace, and dignity at the end of life. Hospice celebrates life and restores hope, even during life’s transitions and challenges, wherever it takes place.

Go ahead: ask your hospice team about options for continued hospice care. They will be glad to help.

Holy Redeemer

For nearly 80 years, the Sisters of the Holy Redeemer have served the community through their mission to care, comfort, and heal. The visionary Sisters created a health system committed to helping people achieve optimal health no matter where they are in life. This includes delivering exceptional medical care not only within the hospital, but also through our outpatient, home care, and long-term care facilities and services. As a result, our health system is well-positioned to serve the community now and in the future.

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